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Thoughts in Charts: The Curve May Change the Strategy

I was talking with a mentor late last year, and she was telling me about this incredibly “reasonable” request from a client. He was asking for a very low risk 2% annual income from an investment that he was happy to hold for the next 15 years. I believe she said something like “I’ll take that request all day”.

This week’s chart illustrates why she felt very confident that she could deliver for this client.  She could go out the maturity ladder to around 10 years and buy US Treasury Note at the appropriate yield. She would get him a 2% annual payment with very low risk.

Had that client asked for a low risk 2% yield at the beginning of 2019, she would have had even less trouble designing a portfolio. In fact, if he had wanted to take periodic withdrawals, she could have built the portfolio with maturities that would accommodate shorter term cash flows without dipping below the 2% yield.

Even in December of 2008 when rates dropped during the Financial Crisis, she could have met his request. Short-term yield very nearly matched what it does today, but she still had options at the longer maturity dates to reach the desired 2% yield.

And then there’s today: his portfolio construction would be much more complex. No matter how far out she looks on the curve, US Treasuries are not offering a 2% annual income. To construct something now, she would be forced to ask the client to take on more risk or lower his annual income expectation to around 0.50%.

Just like my mentor, bond fund managers cannot go out and grab a low risk yield right now. At ThirtyNorth, we are staying vigilant – aware that managers may be digging into higher risk or asking us to accept lower returns. Those adjustments are likely market realities, but we want to be prepared to adjust your allocations in response.